Ethan Hawke reflects on the success of the MCU and The Black Phone

Ethan Hawke reflects on the success of the MCU and The Black Phone

Reputation: Ethan Hawke – Horror has the power to deliver important messages

Ethan Hawke shared what he learned from his time in the MCU after playing the villainous Arthur Harrow in Disney+ moon knight Series.

The actor, whose previous comments on the superhero genre have repeatedly gone viral, spoke to Yahoo while he was promoting The black phone – a dark horror that reunites him Creepy Director Scott Derrickson, in cinemas now.

“What I do realize is that you can talk as much as you want about how the world should be, but sometimes you have to face it and try to make what it is the best it can be,” said the actor.

Continue reading: Why The Black Phone eschews Spielbergian nostalgia

“And I think sometimes that’s a bigger challenge — I want to go where the audience is, for example, and try to give them something good, rather than demanding they be where I want them to be.”

Ethan Hawke as The Grabber in The Black Phone directed by Scott Derrickson.

Ethan Hawke as The Grabber in The black phone, directed by Scott Derrickson. (universal images)

Hawke caused a bit of internet drama in 2018 when he spoke to The Film Stage about the genre.

“Now we have the problem they tell us logan is a great film,” he said. “Well, it’s a great superhero movie.

“It’s still about people in tights with metal coming out of their hands. It’s not Bresson. It’s not Bergman. But they talk about how it is.”

He later added as clarification in an interview with RayWork productionsthat “these are my favorite superhero movies – logan, Doctor Strange, Dark Knight – these are great films. But they’re not the only thing, and young people today are growing up thinking that, you know, that’s all there is.”

Oscar Isaac stars in Marvel Studios' Moon Knight.  (Disney+)

Ethan Hawke at Marvel Studios moon knight. (Disney+)

Basically, his comments are really about how increasingly difficult it is for mid-budget adults to survive at the box office. The big exception here, however, is probably horror – the genre of The black phone.

Hawke told Yahoo, “The interesting thing about the horror genre is that it’s always been very commercial. When a theater fears going under, they are happy to hang up Macbethbecause the horror game captivates the audience.

Continue reading: Creepy crowned the scariest horror film by science

“You always have an appetite for it. And if you use it properly, you can really do whatever you want within the genre.”

Ethan Hawke as The Grabber in The Black Phone directed by Scott Derrickson.

Ethan Hawke as The Grabber in The black phone, directed by Scott Derrickson. (universal images)

Jordan Peeles Go outabout a black man’s nightmarish visit to meet his white girlfriend’s parents proved to be a huge critical, financial and cultural success.

For Hawke, “One could argue that this is the best film about systemic racism that America has made. And it’s just a funny scary movie. If you said, “I’m making an important film about systemic racism,” no one would leave.

“But if you want to tell a scary story — and it’s going to be really funny and really scary — they’ll go, and then you can use your themes as a Trojan horse, sort of.”

The black phone, an adaptation of the 2004 short story by Joe Hill (son of legendary horror author Stephen King), is about a young boy named Finney Shaw (Mason Thomas). On a clear day, Finney is attacked in the middle of the sidewalk outside his school by a masked man known only to him as The Grabber (Hawke) and thrown into a van.

(from left) Terrence Shaw (Jeremy Davies), Detective Wright (E. Roger Mitchell), Gwen Shaw (Madeleine McGraw) and Detective Miller (Troy Rudeseal) in The Black Phone, directed by Scott Derrickson.

Terrence Shaw (Jeremy Davies), Detective Wright (E. Roger Mitchell), Gwen Shaw (Madeleine McGraw) and Detective Miller (Troy Rudeseal). The black phone. (universal images)

He wakes up in a basement. All there is is an old mattress and a switched off phone. His only hope lies with his sister Gwen (Madeleine McGraw), whose dreams begin to provide psychic clues as to his whereabouts.

“It’s really about a brother and sister who love each other and look out for each other in a world that doesn’t seem to care,” Hawke said. “There are all these adults who are either actively malicious or not engaged. And they, this young man and these young women, take care of themselves and each other.”

The black phone is now in UK cinemas. Check out a trailer below.

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